Мартин Генри / Martin Henry

Родился 15-го июля 1925-го года в Луисвилле, Кентукки. Мартин учился в Принстонском Университете и получил степень бакалавра в 1948-м году. Затем следовали два года обучения в Американской Академии Искусства. Помимо регулярного появления в Нью-Йоркере он также работал с Punch, Ladies Home Journal, Saturday Review, Good Housekeeping, Gourmet and Audubon. Кроме того, он рисовал для ежедневной рубрики, которая называлась Good News/Bad News для Chicago Tribune – New York News Syndicate. Отдельно опубликованы коллекции его рисунков, включая работы для Good News/Bad News (Scribner’s), Yak! Yak! Blah! Blah! (Scribner’s) и All Those in Favor (American Management Association). Мартин состоит в Национальном Обществе Карикатуристов и является обладателем Второй Премии Международной выставки Карикатуры в Монреале.

 

 

He was born in Louisville, Kentucky, on July 15, 1925. Henry Mar­tin was educated at Princeton University and received his bachelor’s degree in 1948. Two years of training at the American Academy of Art followed. Besides regu­lar appearances in the New Yorker, he has also con­tributed to Punch, Ladies’ Home Journal, Saturday Review, Good Housekeeping, Gourmet and Audubon. In addition, he has created a syndicated daily panel feature for the Chicago Tribune-New York News Syn­dicate entitled Good News/Bad News. Separately pub­lished collections of his work include Good News/Bad News (Scribner’s). Yak! Yak! Blah! Blah! (Scribner’s) and All Those in Favor (American Management As­sociation).

 

Martin’s specialty as a cartoonist is the world of business. He has apparently studied it well or been part of it and so is frequently encountered peeking into offices and boardrooms or following the execu­tive home after a busy day’s work. Working in India ink and wash, Martin renders his ideas with a sharp, unbroken line. His is a bold technique, but it is in substance rather than style that Martin makes his most individualistic statements. He has an ear for the cliche and an eye for the absurd in his gentle satires on the mores of the corporate and advertising communities – which is not to say that ho cannot find a fresh twist on an idea as overworked as the desert island or advert with great charm to the days of our Neanderthal ancestors. He also, as befits a Princeton man, has a way with “old grad” humor.

 

Many examples of Martin’s “funny business” have appeared in the New Yorker. In one cartoon, he shares with us the contentment of the vacationing busi­nessman who discovers a newsstand advertising the New York Times minus the financial section. In another, two executives learn, as a fellow sails toward them from the floor below, that “kicked upstairs” is not after all an empty figure of speech. Finally, in an age when one finds the strangest things advertised on television, we see the shock of a viewer who beholds on his screen “the old bum you often see panhandling on the corner of 43rd Street and Sixth Avenue. As we approach the Christmas Season, I hope you won’t forget me. just mail your dollars today to ‘Bum – Christmas’ in care of this station.”

 

Martin belongs to the National Cartoonists Society and holds a Deuxieme Prix from the Salon Interna­tional de la Caricature, Montreal. His work is repre­sented in the Swann, David E. Lilienthal and IBM collections, all housed in the Princeton library.

 

the World Encyclopedia of Cartoons 1981

 


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